ARTIST PROFILE: CAMILLE HENROT

“Camille Henrot: The Pale Fox.”  Exhibition view: Chisenhale Gallery, London, 2014. PHOTO: Andy Keate. Courtesy of the artist.

“Camille Henrot: The Pale Fox.” Exhibition view: Chisenhale Gallery, London, 2014. PHOTO: Andy Keate. Courtesy of the artist.

CAMILLE HENROT QUESTIONS where history begins, often incorporating indigenous cultures and anthropological research into her practice. Her most recent exhibition, “The Pale Fox” (2014), is an architectural display integrating found objects, sculpture, drawing, and digital images. The title is taken from a 1965 anthropological study of the West African Dogon people, whose mythology synthesizes the beliefs of multiple cultures and systems of thought.

Camille Henrot Taipei

Camille Henrot, Faciathérapie (Mina Hebbaz), 2011
Bronze, 71 x 37 x 7 cm. Courtesy of the artist and kamel mennour, Paris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was announced last week that the New York-based French artist has won the 2014 Nam June Paik Award. Now seven years old, the prize is awarded to an artist whose work maintains a relationship with the late Nam June Paik, largely recognized as one of the founders of video art. With “Nam June Paik: Becoming Robot” recently opening at the Asia Society Museum in New York, his hybrid video installations are currently on the art world’s radar.

Henrot was recognized with a Silver Lion at the 2013 Venice Biennale for her video, Grosse Fatigue. Her work has been exhibited at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London; the Centre Pompidou; the Louvre; the Musée d’Art Moderne; the Palais de Tokyo; the New Orleans Museum of Art; Schinkel Pavillon, Berlin; the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux, France; Chisenhale Gallery, London; and the New Museum, New York.

Family of Robot: Mother, 1986. Single-channel video sculpture with vintage television and radio casings and monitors; tuner; liquid crystal display; color;silent. 78 x 61 1/2 x 20 3/4 in. (203 x 156 x 53 cm). Nagoya City Art Museum. Image courtesy of Nagoya City Art Museum.

Nam June Paik, Family of Robot: Mother, 1986. Single-channel video sculpture with vintage television and radio casings and monitors; tuner; liquid crystal display; color;silent. 78 x 61 1/2 x 20 3/4 in. (203 x 156 x 53 cm). Nagoya City Art Museum. Image courtesy of Nagoya City Art Museum.

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Post in: Reviews Web Exclusive | October 7 , 2014 | Tag in: Web Exclusive | TEXT: Lida Zeitlin Wu
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